Bug Out Bags And How We Build Them

How We Stack Em' (Read This First)

Although we have a lot of bug out bags to choose from, there are only 6 gear levels,plus our mixed level bags. Which means, there really only 7 types of bug out bags to choose from once you choose the pack setup or Class of your bag. Simply choose the pack setup that you like, then choose an equipment level. Here's how it works:

1. We build Our Bug out bags using seven different backpacks. (How cool is That?)

2. Each backpack setup represents a "class" of bug out bags.

3. Each class is labeled phonetically as follows:

  • Alpha Class - Small - NcStar Assault Pack
  • Bravo Class - Medium - NcStar 3 Day Assault Pack
  • Delta Class - Medium Condor Convoy Pack
  • Echo Class - Large - Condor - 125 3 Day Assault Pack
  • Sierra Class - Large - Eberlestock - V69 Destroyer Pack
  • Zulu Class -Extra Large - Extra Large - Eberlestock G4 Operator Pack
  • Ultra 2 Person Class - Extra Large - Eberlestock J79 SkyCrane II Pack

4. Each class has multiple equipment levels, these levels are dictated by the size of the pack:

  • Alpha Class (Mixed Levels 1,2,3,L)
  • Bravo Class (Equipment Levels 1,2,3,4,L)
  • Delta Class (Equipment Levels 1,2,3,4,L)
  • Echo Class (Equipment Levels 3,4,5,6,L)
  • Sierra Class (Equipment Levels 4,5,6,L)
  • Ultra Class (Equipment Levels 4,5,6,L)
  • Zulu Class (Equipment Levels 4,5,6,L)

5. Important Equipment levels are the same regardless of which backpack class you choose.

6. Meaning, an Echo Class level 3, has the exact same equipment as a Zulu Class level 3, the only difference is the pack setup.

7. Equipment levels contain seven sections, or Corekits.

8. Corekits grow in size and price the higher the level.

  • Packs & Pouches Corekit (Alpha, Bravo, Delta, Foxtrot, Echo, Sierra, Tango, Ultra, Zulu)
  • Water & Rations (Levels 1,2,3,4,5)
  • Knife & Tools (Levels 1,2,3,4,5)
  • Lights & Energy (Levels 1,2,3,4,5)
  • Shelter & Warmth (Levels 1,2,3,4,5)
  • First Aid & Hygiene (Levels 1,2,3,4,5,6)
  • Survival Corekit (Levels 1,2,3,4,5,6)

 

Class / Backpack Setup Go Bags
Level 1
Get Home
Level 2
72 Hr
Level 3
Tactical
Level 4
Long Range
Level 5
WOTFOTE
Level 6
NcStar Small Assault Pack
Shop Alpha Class Bags
Limited by
Pack Size
Limited by
Pack Size
Small & Compact Bug Out Bags
Shop Delta Class Bags
Limited by
Pack Size
Limited by
Pack Size
Shop Bravo Class Bags
Shop Bravo Class Bags
*Limited by
Weight
Limited by
Pack Size
Small & Compact Bug Out Bags
Shop Echo Class Bags
N/A
Small & Compact Bug Out Bags
Shop Sierra Class Bags
N/A N/A
Shop Ultra Class Bags
Shop Ultra Class Bags
N/A N/A N/A
Small & Compact Bug Out Bags
Shop Zulu Class Bags
N/A N/A N/A N/A
Gear Level - 1 - Go bags, Car bags & BOB Starter kits.
Gear Level - 2 - Get Home Bags - bags designed for A-B bug out missions
Gear Level - 3 - 72 Hour Bags - These bags are easily converted for longer missions
Gear Level - 4 - Tactical Bags - Offers permanent shelter and additional tools
Gear Level - 5 - Tactical Bags and Long Range Patrol Bags (all you need for an extended mission)
Gear Level - 6 - Long Range Patrol Bags (walk into the woods and never return)

Pack & Pouch Setups
NcStar 3 Day Assault Pack - 2200 Cubic Inches
Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Included in Kit

NcStar 3 Day Assault Pack - 2200 Cubic Inches:

Assault Backpack is the perfect size to carry 3 Days of essential gear. Multiple compartments and MOLLE webbing to organize and customize your backpack to your needs. With over 2,200 sq inches of storage capacity.

- Hydration bladder compatible, with drink tube routing onto either Padded shoulder straps with metal D-rings
- Adjustable Sternum and Waist Straps with quick connect buckles
- MOLLE compatible webbing on the front & bottom pockets, shoulder straps, and the sides of the backpack
- Heavy Duty Lockable Zippers on ALL of the compartments to keep your valuables secure
- Carry Handle Strap on the Top with hydration hose pass-through's on both sides of Strap
- Four Adjustable Side Compression Straps on the Sides of the backpack
- Durable PVC construction, that is chemical and water resistant

Specifications:

- Main Compartment Dimensions: 18" H x 12" W x 6.5" D (1404 Square Inches). With Hydration compatible compartment, two large pockets, zippered compartment, and two smaller pockets
- Middle Compartment Dimensions: 18" H x 12" W x 2.5" D (540 Square Inches). With a large mesh internal zippered compartment, 3 pockets, and two pen pockets
- Top Outside Compartment: 5" H x 10.25" W x 1.25" D (64 Square Inches), 1" H x 5" W loop fastener for attaching Name Tape. With two internal pockets
- Bottom Outside Compartment: 10.75"H x 10.75"W x 1.75" D (202 Square Inches), with a 2" H x 3" W loop fastener for attaching hook and loop patches. With two internal zippered compartments, two mesh pockets, and a key chain holder

Included in Kit

Hook & Loop Logo Patch

  • PVC Material
  • Hook backed for loop attachment
  • Choose from Seven Styles
Included in Kit

Condor MA64: MOLLE Side Kick Pouch

The Condor Sidekick pouch is the percfect low profile, versatile, MOLLE utility pouch, perfect for a small survival kit, or for all your tools, such as Allen wrench, mini flashlight, pocket knife, pen, and other accessories. The para-cord creates a 90 degree angle and makes it work station.

- Fully opens with paracords to adjust
- One internal pocket
- Multiple elastic holders
- One external pocket with zipper closure
- Webbing over entire pouch for more attachments
- 3"H x 5"W ID/ Patch panel

Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Nylon / Polypropylene Sleeping Bag Straps

Straps are 3/4” (2 cm) polypropylene 48” (1.22 cm) in length and have a quick tab release buckle. Easy to cut and seal to desired length. Frequently substituted: Coleman's version of the same straps.

  • 75" x 48"
  • Easily secures most sleeping bag sizes
  • Strong polypropylene straps
  • Non-slip, sewn-on slide stop buckle
  • Two straps per package
Included in Kit

2.5 Liter Backpack Hydration Bladder System

  • 2.5L water storage 
  • Screw top cap with carry handle
  • Large bite valve with lid
  • Flow shut-off switch
  • Hanger slots for mounting and drying
Condor 169 - Convoy Assault Pack 1350ci
Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Condor 169 - Convoy Assault Pack

1360 Cubic Inches:

The Condor Convoy Outdoor Pack was designed with the thought that people would rise to the challenge to do more with less. So Condor took the 125 3-Day Assault Pack, one of the best sellers, scaled it down and made it so that it would be functional enough to get your through whatever adventure you took it on. The Convoy features five compartments designed to organize and hold all your essentials for that survivalist in you.

Total of five compartments:

  • Main Compartment contains a padded sleeve for tablets or 13"/15" laptop and two mesh pockets
  • Top Front compartment contains an organizer.
  • Bottom Front compartment contains mesh pockets for additional utilities/peripherals.
  • Two side pockets compartments are perfect for 16fl oz water bottles or any quick access gadgets
  •  Heavyweight webbing for modular attachments. 
  • Padded mesh backing for reinforcement and airflow.
  • Detachable waist belt
  • Sternum strap
  • Side compression straps
  • Grommets on all compartments
  • Hydration compatible
Included in Kit

Hook & Loop Logo Patch

  • PVC Material
  • Hook backed for loop attachment
  • Choose from Seven Styles
Included in Kit

Condor MA64: MOLLE Side Kick Pouch

The Condor Sidekick pouch is the percfect low profile, versatile, MOLLE utility pouch, perfect for a small survival kit, or for all your tools, such as Allen wrench, mini flashlight, pocket knife, pen, and other accessories. The para-cord creates a 90 degree angle and makes it work station.

- Fully opens with paracords to adjust
- One internal pocket
- Multiple elastic holders
- One external pocket with zipper closure
- Webbing over entire pouch for more attachments
- 3"H x 5"W ID/ Patch panel

Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Nylon / Polypropylene Sleeping Bag Straps

Straps are 3/4” (2 cm) polypropylene 48” (1.22 cm) in length and have a quick tab release buckle. Easy to cut and seal to desired length. Frequently substituted: Coleman's version of the same straps.

  • 75" x 48"
  • Easily secures most sleeping bag sizes
  • Strong polypropylene straps
  • Non-slip, sewn-on slide stop buckle
  • Two straps per package
Included in Kit

2.5 Liter Backpack Hydration Bladder System

  • 2.5L water storage 
  • Screw top cap with carry handle
  • Large bite valve with lid
  • Flow shut-off switch
  • Hanger slots for mounting and drying
Condor 125 - 3 Day Assault Pack 3030ci
Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Condor 125 - 3 Day Assault Pack

Massive 3038 Cubes:

  • Large load cargo capacity compartment with separate pocket to fit up to two 3L hydration bladders.
  • Body contour shoulder straps with D-Ring for equipment attachment, sternum strap and waist belt.
  • External side compression straps.
  • Heavy-Duty carry and drag handle.
  • Two double zipper pulls on the main compartment for easy access.
  • Individual foam pad back panel for extra comfort and maximum airflow.
  • Grommets on all compartments for drainage.

Total of seven compartments:

  • Main Compartment with gear straps to secure gears and two extra mesh pockets.
  • Second Compartment contains three map/document pockets, two radio pockets, and penholders.
  • Two large pockets on the back, bottom pocket (12.5" x 6" x 3") with three elastic closure mash pocket and a zipper mesh pocket.
  • Two side pockets (9" x 5" x 2.5") one on each side.
  • One Compartment for hydration systems.
Included in Kit

Hook & Loop Logo Patch

  • PVC Material
  • Hook backed for loop attachment
  • Choose from Seven Styles
Included in Kit

Condor MA54: MOLLE T&T Pouch

The Condor T & T pouch is a low profile, versatile, utility pouch for all your tools, such as allen wrenches, mini flashlight, pocket knife, pen, and other accessories. There are three ways to use the pouch: 1. UsiSng the zipper stopper creates a low profile utility pouch. 2. Use the paracords to create a 90 degree angle and make a work station. 3. Use it as a stand-alone tool pouch and it opens flat for accessibility

  • Fully opens with paracords to adjust.
  • One internal sleeve, one zipper pocket, and multiple elastic holders
  • Foldible Removable 7H" x 12W" vinyl sleeve
  • 3"H x 10"W ID/Patches panel
  • Removable back straps
  • Two D-ring on the back
Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Nylon / Polypropylene Sleeping Bag Straps

Straps are 3/4” (2 cm) polypropylene 48” (1.22 cm) in length and have a quick tab release buckle. Easy to cut and seal to desired length. Frequently substituted: Coleman's version of the same straps.

  • 75" x 48"
  • Easily secures most sleeping bag sizes
  • Strong polypropylene straps
  • Non-slip, sewn-on slide stop buckle
  • Two straps per package
Included in Kit

2.5 Liter Backpack Hydration Bladder System

  • 2.5L water storage 
  • Screw top cap with carry handle
  • Large bite valve with lid
  • Flow shut-off switch
  • Hanger slots for mounting and drying
Eberlestock Destroyer Setup (3600ci)

Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Eberlestock V69 Destroyer

3660 Cubic Inches:

Eberlestock enters the world of "conventional" packs with some unconventional twists. Please understand, they're only unconventional in the sense that they're nicer, and more fully detailed than other packs in this class. It seems that most manufacturers have taken so many shortcuts in the trend toward minimalism that they have forgotten what it's like to live out of a backpack.

Something else you'll like about the V69. For its scale, its extremely light weight. Eberlestock has carefully chosen new materials that give the optimum balance between high strength and light weight, and arranged them very cleverly, if we do say. Every feature and detail has a purpose, and many of them have multiple purposes.

The V-type packs are double-deckers... with both top loading and front loading features, it's easy to find your gear wherever in the pack you have it stowed. It also has the great benefit of a full array of compression and lash straps. Each surface of the pack can be compressed and each set of straps can be used to quickly grapple something to the pack. So you have a very simple and versatile, and ultimately practical backpack. 

Includes a fitted rain cover that pulls out of a bottom pocket. 

Included in Kit

Hook & Loop Logo Patch

  • PVC Material
  • Hook backed for loop attachment
  • Choose from Seven Styles
Included in Kit

Condor MA54: MOLLE T&T Pouch

The Condor T & T pouch is a low profile, versatile, utility pouch for all your tools, such as allen wrenches, mini flashlight, pocket knife, pen, and other accessories. There are three ways to use the pouch: 1. UsiSng the zipper stopper creates a low profile utility pouch. 2. Use the paracords to create a 90 degree angle and make a work station. 3. Use it as a stand-alone tool pouch and it opens flat for accessibility

  • Fully opens with paracords to adjust.
  • One internal sleeve, one zipper pocket, and multiple elastic holders
  • Foldible Removable 7H" x 12W" vinyl sleeve
  • 3"H x 10"W ID/Patches panel
  • Removable back straps
  • Two D-ring on the back
Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Nylon / Polypropylene Sleeping Bag Straps

Straps are 3/4” (2 cm) polypropylene 48” (1.22 cm) in length and have a quick tab release buckle. Easy to cut and seal to desired length. Frequently substituted: Coleman's version of the same straps.

  • 75" x 48"
  • Easily secures most sleeping bag sizes
  • Strong polypropylene straps
  • Non-slip, sewn-on slide stop buckle
  • Two straps per package
Included in Kit

Eberlestock 70 oz. / 2 Liter Hydration System

ES backpacks are ready to accommodate ES top-of-the-line hydration systems. You'll find that they have dedicated bladder pockets, louvered tube portals, and tube-friendly harnesses. We think this is the ultimate hydration bladder system. Made by Source®, ES premium bladders are BPA-free, use patented anti-bacterial technology, and Glass-Like™ liner, so that you get a product that gives great tasting drinks and long life. ES added their own specifications to make this into the hydration system that best fits ES products and the things that ES customers will be doing with them. Special standard features include a weave covered insulated drink tube, a lockable bike-bottle style push-pull drink valve with a dirt shield. Dual-fill options allow open-end access or use of a screw-off Nalgene size cap.
Eberlestock Terminator Setup (4100ci)
Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Eberleystock F4 Terminator - 4100CI

The F4M Terminator is an extremely versatile full-format load bearing pack. The Terminator is an excellent all-around rucksack, easy to live out of, and is a great load hauler. It's optimized for the scout/sniper mission, with a unique articulating rear interior wall that allows a weapon to be carried near the wearer's back.

When not carrying a weapon, the wall is pressed against the frame to maximize conventional interior load space. You can add any of our side scabbards, sliding them into the weapon sleeve, to tailor quick-access weapon carriage to match your gun. Includes a pull-out pack cover.

  • Volume:  4100 c.i.  (67 Liter)
  • System Wt: 9 lb 10 oz (4.32 kg)
  • Basic Pack Wt:  8 lb 12 oz  (3.86 kg)
  • Construction:  500d + 1000d Nylon
  • Actual weight = 9.5 lbs.

The F4M is laid out much like the G4M Operator, but instead of a built-in weapon carrier, the pack is a conventional pack with configurable load bay.  The weapons bay puts the weapon next to the wearer's body, and when used with the optional A4SS Tactical Weapon Carrier, all man-portable sniper rifles can be carried. 

The pack is also compatible with A1SS, A2SS, and A2LS Side Scabbards.A trap door on the back of the main lid of the pack opens to allow the insertion of a scabbard or for the carriage of a weapon resting on the bottom of the pack without use of the scabbard. Eberleystock developed this version of our F4 Terminator pack for the US army. It has all of the features of their regular F4 pack with the following modifications:

  • -The pack's main body is larger, and the lower compartment is also enlarged to better accommodate larger sleep systems.
  • The upper front flap's pocket is removed and replaced by a standard MOLLE compatible matrix.
  • The zippers for the side sleeve access are removed, and the long side pockets are attached directly to the sides of the pack. IT
  • Ghillie-Tex hardware is used throughout, including U.S. mil-spec quick-release harness main buckles.
  • The top flap is modified to extend vertically, and the storm collar is considerably longer, thereby adding an expandable interior volume.

 

Included in Kit

Hook & Loop Logo Patch

  • PVC Material
  • Hook backed for loop attachment
  • Choose from Seven Styles
Included in Kit

Condor MA54: MOLLE T&T Pouch

The Condor T & T pouch is a low profile, versatile, utility pouch for all ythe tools, such as allen wrenches, mini flashlight, pocket knife, pen, and other accessories. There are three ways to use the pouch: 1. UsiSng the zipper stopper creates a low profile utility pouch. 2. Use the paracords to create a 90 degree angle and make a work station. 3. Use it as a stand-alone tool pouch and it opens flat for accessibility

  • Fully opens with paracords to adjust.
  • One internal sleeve, one zipper pocket, and multiple elastic holders
  • Foldible Removable 7H" x 12W" vinyl sleeve
  • 3"H x 10"W ID/Patches panel
  • Removable back straps
  • Two D-ring on the back
Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Nylon / Polypropylene Sleeping Bag Straps

Straps are 3/4” (2 cm) polypropylene 48” (1.22 cm) in length and have a quick tab release buckle. Easy to cut and seal to desired length. Frequently substituted: Coleman's version of the same straps.

  • 75" x 48"
  • Easily secures most sleeping bag sizes
  • Strong polypropylene straps
  • Non-slip, sewn-on slide stop buckle
  • Two straps per package
Included in Kit

Eberlestock 100 oz. / 3 Liter Hydration System

ES backpacks are ready to accommodate ES top-of-the-line hydration systems. You'll find that they have dedicated bladder pockets, louvered tube portals, and tube-friendly harnesses. We think this is the ultimate hydration bladder system. Made by Source®, ES premium bladders are BPA-free, use patented anti-bacterial technology, and Glass-Like™ liner, so that you get a product that gives great tasting drinks and long life. ES added their own specifications to make this into the hydration system that best fits ES products and the things that ES customers will be doing with them. Special standard features include a weave covered insulated drink tube, a lockable bike-bottle style push-pull drink valve with a dirt shield. Dual-fill options allow open-end access or use of a screw-off Nalgene size cap.
Eberlestock Skycrane Setup (4470ci)
 
Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Included in Kit

The J79 Skycrane II is a modular load bearing system consisting of three primary bags: the basic J79 pack, the pull-out G1 “Little Brother” pack, and a removable fanny/ctheier pack. These components comprise the basic system, with a volume of 4475 cubic inches. 

Add an optional J2SD Spike Duffel to get 6275 cubic inches, or choose the J3SD Super Spike Duffel to reach its maximum capacity of 7375 cubic inches (duffels not included with basic pack system).

The J79 is a modular, scalable pack system. It is a truly innovative approach to pack design, and it's very effective. Sorry to say it, but there have been other vague attempts at this concept, and they usually have ended up not working very ESll and ESighing 20 pounds. The Skycrane II, hoESver, is a very nice high performance backpack.

It's built around a 2300 cubic inch internal frame pack that employs the patented Cam Expansion system and that ESighs only 6.5 lbs. The basic pack, unlike most pack frames, has some essential storage capacity, so you will always have hydration and survival gear storage, no matter which way you configure the system. Its unique design allows it to perform exceptionally ESll in a variety of configurations.

It is reducible all the way down to a fanny pack, and scalable all the way up to a full-scale 8375 cubic inch freighter that can tackle anything from an M4 to the M107 Barrett to a boat motor. The system has a variety of gear compartments and storage spaces that are designed for flexibility, ease of operation, and accessibility.

It has the rugged, field-proven construction that has been impressing operators around the world since ES perfected the pack design and construction concepts. And above all, it is designed for comfort, to ride ESll day after day, and to increase the agility of those who are lucky enough to have at the heart of their mission-essential gear.

The A4SS Tactical ESapon carrier, and other ES Side Scabbards, and a variety of components can be added to make a seamless pack system that can be selectively configured and optimized to a variety of missions. The basic J79 pack has a fully adjustable, robust internal aluminum/plastic frame system which can be optimized for direct-to-back carry or over-armor carry. 

Unique proprietary features enable the ESapons carriers to be used singly or in combination, and to be mounted to either the J79 or G1 packs. Both the J79 and G1 are compatible with PRC-117 type radios and other modern battlefield communications gear.

ES made the J79 visually similar to the G4 Operator and F4 Terminator backpacks. This family of pack systems leads the way in modern military pack design, in which entire units can be fitted with packs suited to individual specialties. Because the packs have similar visual characteristics, identification of snipers and other specialist personnel will be more difficult for the enemy.

The J79 is the second-generation Skycrane, developed from the J263 Skycrane I. The J263 was extremely ESll liked by soldiers in the field, who found it to be the best platform available for carrying modern heavy-class sniper rifles.

The original J263 model was a pretty big pack. As the idea evolved into the J79 Skycrane II, one of the changes that ES decided upon was to make the new pack narroouer in the frame. This way, when the J79 is in the compact mode, it's a nicely proportioned rucksack, in what ES consider the ideal dimensions for a multi-day military pack. It's scaled the same as the G4 Operator and the F4 Terminator, and has the unique ability to either grow or reduce its size depending on the mission.

Combined System Volume - 4475 c.i.
Expandable to: 7375 c.i.
System ESight - 11.9
Construction 1000d Ripstop Nylon

Included in Kit

Hook & Loop Logo Patch

  • PVC Material
  • Hook backed for loop attachment
  • Choose from Seven Styles
Included in Kit

Condor MA54: MOLLE T&T Pouch

The Condor T & T pouch is a low profile, versatile, utility pouch for all ythe tools, such as allen wrenches, mini flashlight, pocket knife, pen, and other accessories. There are three ways to use the pouch: 1. UsiSng the zipper stopper creates a low profile utility pouch. 2. Use the paracords to create a 90 degree angle and make a work station. 3. Use it as a stand-alone tool pouch and it opens flat for accessibility

  • Fully opens with paracords to adjust.
  • One internal sleeve, one zipper pocket, and multiple elastic holders
  • Foldible Removable 7H" x 12W" vinyl sleeve
  • 3"H x 10"W ID/Patches panel
  • Removable back straps
  • Two D-ring on the back
Included in Kit

Included in Kit

Nylon / Polypropylene Sleeping Bag Straps

Straps are 3/4” (2 cm) polypropylene 48” (1.22 cm) in length and have a quick tab release buckle. Easy to cut and seal to desired length. Frequently substituted: Coleman's version of the same straps.

  • 75" x 48"
  • Easily secures most sleeping bag sizes
  • Strong polypropylene straps
  • Non-slip, sewn-on slide stop buckle
  • Two straps per package
Included in Kit

Eberlestock 100 oz. / 3 Liter Hydration System

ES backpacks are ready to accommodate ES top-of-the-line hydration systems. You'll find that they have dedicated bladder pockets, louvered tube portals, and tube-friendly harnesses. We think this is the ultimate hydration bladder system. Made by Source®, ES premium bladders are BPA-free, use patented anti-bacterial technology, and Glass-Like™ liner, so that you get a product that gives great tasting drinks and long life. ES added their own specifications to make this into the hydration system that best fits ES products and the things that ES customers will be doing with them. Special standard features include a weave covered insulated drink tube, a lockable bike-bottle style push-pull drink valve with a dirt shield. Dual-fill options allow open-end access or use of a screw-off Nalgene size cap.


Bug Out Bag Equipment Levels
Packs & Pouch Corekit
Feature Alpha Bravo Delta Echo Sierra Ultra Zulu
NcStar Compact Assault Pack
           
NcStar 3 Day Assault Pack (2200ci)
           
Condor Convoy Assault Pack (1400ci)
           
Condor 125 3 Day Assault Pack (3000ci)
           
Eberlestock V69 Destroyer (3600ci)
           
Eberlestock G4 Terminator (4100ci)
           
Eberlestock SkyCrane II (4475ci)
           
UBB Brand Patch
USA Flag Patch
Condor MA64 Sidekick Tool Pouch (SM)
       
Condor MA54 Sidekick Tool Pouch (LG)
     
Nylon Sleeping Bag Straps
   
2.5 Liter Hydration System
       
Eberlestock 2 Liter Hydration System
       
Rations & Hydration Corekit
Feature Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
SOS - 12ct Purified Drinking Water (1.5L)
  N/A
SOS - Emergency Rations 3600 Kcal
N/A
6ct SOS - New Millennium Energy Bars
      N/A
3 - Mountain House ProPaks
        N/A
Sawyer - 100,000g Water Filter
    N/A
Aquamira Water Bottle Filter
        N/A
LifeStraw Personal Straw Filter
        N/A
Drinking Water Tablets 50ct
      N/A
Canteen w/ Cover & Aluminium Cup
    N/A
Tools & Blades Corekit
Feature Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
SOG Knives Fielder Lock blade
      N/A
SOG Knives Seal Revolver
      N/A
SOG Knives Seal Pup
      N/A
SOG Knives Entrenching Tool
N/A
SOGFari Machete Machete
    N/A
SOG Knives - Folding Saw
      N/A
SOG Knives Hand Axe
        N/A
Whet Rock Sharpening Stone
N/A
Lights & Energy Corekit
Feature Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
Crank Flashlight w/ Radio, Phone Charger
N/A
Maglite Solitaire AAA Flashlight
        N/A
Rothco 9 Bulb Headlamp
        N/A
Streamlight 45 Lumen MicroStream Black
        N/A
Streamlight - Enduro Headlamp Headlamp
    N/A
Fenix 960-Lumen USB Chargeable Flashlight
    N/A
UST 30-Day Lantern Titanium
        N/A
SunJack 14W Solar Panel
        N/A
8000mAh Ultraslim Fast Charge Battery
        N/A
USB Solar Powered CampLight
        N/A
SunJack USB Rechargeable Headlamp
        N/A
Shelter & Warmth Corekit
Feature Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
SOL Regular Waterproof Bivi
      N/A
SOL LARGE Waterproof Bivi
    N/A
Emergency Two Person Tube Tent
      N/A
Adult Size Poncho OD
    N/A
UST - B.A.S.E. Tube Tarp Tent
      N/A
SnugPak - Ionosphere Tactical Tent
        N/A
Tex Sport Tarp, Camouflage 6' x 8'
    N/A
Adult All-Weather Rain Suit
      N/A
Lightweight Dry Bag - 5L, Orange
      N/A
Waterproof Document Pouch 5" x 7"
        N/A
42-Gallon Contractor Trash Bag
N/A
Emergency Hypothermia Blanket
N/A
4ct - Small Hand Warmers
N/A
2ct - Large Body Warmers
    N/A
Leather Palm Work Gloves
  N/A
Warm GI Duty Gloves
        N/A
GI Wool Survival Blanket
      N/A
Alps Mtn. Crescent Lake +20° Mummy Bag
      N/A
ALPS Foam Ground Insulating Mat
        N/A
First Aid & Hygiene Corekit
Feature Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
Waterproof 8 Person Survival Kit
         
FA-181 MOLLE Platoon Trauma Kit
 
NIOSH N95 Respirator Dust Mask
Deluxe Hygiene Kit
 
Foot Care Kit
   
Snake Bite Kit
     
Ben's Bug Spray
       
Mosquito Net No See-Um
       
QuikClot Advanced Clotting Sponge 25g
         
Toilet Tissue- pkg of 2
         
Stainless Steel Surgical kit
         
Potassium Iodide (IOSAT)
         
Loperamide 2 mg 200 ct
         
Survival Corekit
Feature Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
Compact Multi-Piece Survival Kit
6-1 compass, thermometer, flashlight
Snare Wire
Flint Fire Starter with striker
Signal mirror
Wire saw
Multifunctional knife
5 - Pop-up towels
Needle & Thread
Matches, wind & waterproof
Fishing kit (Line, Bobber, Hooks)
Waterproof Zip-bag
Data CD Army 50 Military/Survival Manuals
8'' 1000ct Heavy Duty Cable Ties
Full Size Bic Regular Lighter
Flat-Packed Duct Tape
 
7 Strand 550 lb. Parachute Cord 50'
 
Magnesium Fire Starter
   
UST WetFire Tinder 8-pack
   
Field Sewing Kit
     
Military Marching Compass - Metal
     
Pack Stove & Fuel Tablets
       
Aluminum Mess Kit
       
Chow Kit (Utensils)
       
Stainless Steel Pack Grill
       
Scouter Black Ice Cook Set
       
Eagle Claw 120' Floating Trotline
         
BCB Salt Water Fishing Kit
         
Buckshot's Emergency Snare Kit
         
Buckshot’s Survival Snaring DVD
         
Berkley PowerBait Power Eggs
         
Eagle Claw Fish Spear - 4 Prong
         
The Complete Guide To Edible Plants
         

Bug Out Bags 101 - A Quick Guide

 Ultimate Bug Out Bag - Overview:

Building or buying the "Ultimate Bug Out Bag" is relative to each person's situation. This is because these bags are designed to save your life and help you escape from danger or keep you alive while you head towards safety. The scope of this tutorial will be dedicated to the thought that is needed when planning and your bug out bag.

A “Bug Out Bag” or BOB is a pack you can carry that contains various items you will need to survive for a short or extended period of time. It should be designed to grab and take with you if you have to leave your residence in the event of an crisis. The ultimate bug out bag should be personalized to your geographical location and the probability of natural disasters in that region, so there is no magic formula for building one.

However, this short tutorial will give you a good foundation to build on and some ideas to get you on the right track. Keep in mind, once you build or buy your BOB,  you should take it out on routine trial runs to help you optimize it and rotate the contents so nothing goes bad. It’s also a great excuse to go camping.

There are a number of emergencies that can come up in your life where you may find yourself in a situation that requires you to leave town. This could be caused by a force of nature, social uprising, a bad day at work, black plague, terrorism, or even a zombie outbreak (sigh).

No matter what the cause, you need to be prepared for anything. The most important resource to be prepared, besides a level head and experience in dealing with the specific situation, would be a handy collection of tools and supplies i.e. a bug out bag.. Having a bug out bag on hand will greatly increase your chances of survival.

You probably have most of these items around your home already, but in a situation where time is a issue you want to have these items in a central location so you’re not frantically running around your home at the last minute, lowering your chances of escape. This is where your BOB or “Bug Out Bag” comes in. Even if your first plan of action is to barricade your home, you will need a back up plan–your home or stronghold can easily become compromised.

Ultimate Bug Out Bag - Have a Specific Purpose

You need to have a clear plan or strategy on how the bug out bag will be used. Believe it or not, this one step is the most critical, and the most overlooked step in building or buying a bug out bag.  Will your bug out bag have a specific purpose that facilitates moving from one location to a predetermined bug-out location?

Or, will your bug out bag be used for an open-ended mission; meaning if you bug out it may be for days or weeks until you can find a suitable place to become stationary? The reason this step is so important is because we need to know how much gear to pack in the BOB.

If you know you are bugging out from point A to point B,  you can put a specific list of the items that you will need in your bag which usually leads to a lighter bob. All you need to do is account for the time and terrain between point A and point B. The only other consideration would be if you wanted to pack survival gear for the "point B" location.

If you are bugging out to simply get the hell out of dodge to an non-permanent location, you will need to evaluate how long you intend to stay off-grid. If it is an indefinite amount of time, meaning you may just set up camp in BFE and get cozy for a while, we need to scrutinize a few more variables.

Shelter, water sources and filtration as well as food foraging need to be planned in much more detail than with a Point A-B bob. Either way, not knowing or considering these two strategies will lead you to buying too little or too much stuff and thwarts the whole purpose of a bug out bag, which is preparedness.

 Knowing your terrain, and approximately how far you want or need to travel on "day one" is key to planning your escape from trouble or seeking safety. For instance, if you are planning a vehicle bug out bag you will want to consider the terrain where you most often drive to and from.

Will you be heading home or will you simply be heading away from danger? If your drives are mainly to and from work, check out the terrain that you will most likely be traveling if the need to bug out arises.

Distance, Weight & Terrain

I clumped these all together because they really go hand in hand. The heavier the pack, the slower you will be able to get away from trouble. Depending on your conditioning, it may also dictate how far you can travel in one day, or all together.

Bug out bags that are designed for a point A to point B mission are usually lighter than those designed for an indefinite mission because you can measure food, water and other variables for a specific time frame. So how much should the ultimate bug out bag weigh? Twenty pounds is a good weight for a medium sized point A - point B bug out bag.

Hikers on long trails, like the Appalachian Trail, usually aim for ten to twelve pounds due to the distance and pace they like to travel. The Army likes to strap most soldiers down with around forty pounds of gear. Ten and forty pounds are the extremes, both are "doable" depending on what you want to sacrifice and how much you can stand to carry.

If you are a 140 pound man carrying a 40 lb. pack in a mountainous terrain, you better be in good shape and you should know that this combination will slow you down and reduce the amount of distance you can put between yourself and trouble on day one. You should know this and plan for additional time between the epicenter and your destination.

On the other hand, if you are a minimalist who is heading into the wilderness with an ultralight bob for an indefinite stay, you will be lacking survival gear, and you will probably have to McGyver your way through most situations.

Most minimalist gear is designed to be very light, it is also light-weight in it's durability, so redundancy needs to be factored. Most bob's, at least the good ones, are designed with redundancy on mission critical items life fire, water, food, shelter and foraging, which all adds weight.

Hikers on pre-blazed trails are usually not very far from other hikers or civilization should trouble arise. Survivalist bugging out do not have that luxury. They are often times escaping civilization and trying to avoid other people. Minimalist "survival" bug out bags are often owned by true woodsmen/ survivalist who can fart in a can and spit on a stick to whip up a campsite and dinner.

So, unless you are Bear Grylls, who magically finds the exact type of material his situation calls for on every episode, or a special forces guru, you should lean towards a heavier pack that has more gear in it.  Just be sure that you can handle that amount of weight in your environment.

Shelter & Warmth

You can survive weeks without food, days without water but you'll not survive the night with hypothermia. Therefore, preparing for your bug out area's climate,  terrain and types of predators takes precedent over finding water sources and foraging for food.

We design and engineer all of our bug out bags to be adapted to any climate, if you're building your own bob you should too. Will you be climbing mountains, trekking deserts or crossing rivers? If so, you need to have an appropriate shelter strategy to protect you from hypothermia, dehydration or from predators like bears and mountain lions.

You need to have redundancy in your shelter preparation strategy, meaning a way to sleep when it's cold, hot, snowing or raining. Think about it.  Spending twenty minutes pitching a tent in freezing rain may be enough to kill you if your core body temp drops too low and you cannot raise it.  

You need to be able to find or make a shelter fast, reliable and will protect you from the elements. Warmth is important to sleep, and sleep is important. When you are bugging out, you are trying to put as much distance between yourself and trouble, or trying to get to your bug out location as soon as possible.

 If you are unable to get enough sleep exhaustion will set in and slow you down, cloud your senses  and severely affect your ability to survive. I am going to do, or have already done (depending on when you read this) a section on survival shelters that goes into shelter building and planning.

However, for the scope of this tutorial just suffice it to say, shelter is a "biggie" and is usually the most expensive part of your BOB. So know your terrain, know your skill set and don't go cheap in this section.

Hydration & Water Sources

Obviously, water is your next big concern when planning a bug out bag and strategy. This is another area of concern where you need to know the environment and terrain where you will be bugging out to or in. Carrying water is burdensome to say the least. It's heavy and is quickly used up in hot environments.

So the first thing you need to ask when you are devising a bug out strategy is: Does this area have a water source, polluted or otherwise, that can be counted on while bugging out? If so, you need to plan on using, and be able to find, these sources while bugging out. 

Then, you need to make sure you have a water filter, and preferably some water purification tablets. Most of your light or "straw based" filters will filter out 99.9% of the things that make you sick. Filters, used in conjunction with tablets (or drops) allow you to make 100% sure that you do not get any foodborne viruses.

Just remember, dysentery has killed as many soldiers as war has.  When you're "bugging out" even the smallest infection or  illness can kill you or get you caught, at the very least slow your progress to dangerous levels. Tablets also allow you to fill your canteen or bladder and keep moving without having to stop and take the time to filter water.

 Food and Foraging

This concern is best answered by the question: "What is the longest amount of time I might have to be in the wilderness?" Most bug out bags that you buy or build will use  ration and energy bars to save space and weight. These are needed to provide energy and sustenance during the initial phases of your bug out plan. Beyond that, you will need to plan for food by foraging, trapping, hunting and fishing.

Keep in mind, unless you have already developed these skills (trapping, hunting and fishing) this will be your Achilles heel. No amount of equipment that can be packed into a bug out bag will make you good at these skills. They may "aid" you to better perform these skills, but you will need to have foreknowledge of how to perform these skills before embarking on an extended bug out. We highly recommend you begin training now.

One reason we do not put a ton of food in our bug out bags (anymore) is based on the fact that this is usually an item that people have prepped for. Meaning, if you're bugging out from home, chances are, you have some food preps already and will grab an adequate amount of these preps on your way out the door.

You can take canned goods (which are heavy), dried foods, or pre packaged  items that can be prepared easily by adding water. A lot of people like to have MRE's in their bug out bags, which we at survivalist 101 actually do not recommend unless you will in a low water source environment like a dessert.

You might ask "why in the world would we not recommend MRE's when our government uses these for all of our soldiers?" The short answer is weight. MREs' are basically canned foods without the can. Instead they use a thick foil (mylar) container to hold the food, that is slightly lighter than the cans most food comes in.

Imagine spaghettios in a pouch, it's lighter than the can, but heavier than freeze dried foods. Freeze dried food pack lighter and taste better than MREs' do, and that's a fact. The biggest objection I usually hear from some people is: "you have to have water to prepare freeze dried food, what if you don't have water?" My response is usually, "If you do not have a cup of water to cook a freeze dried meal with, food isn't your problem."

Not to mention, just because you cook your food with water doesn't mean the water is "lost." The moisture goes into the food, and then your body, it's not wasted. Now, as I stated earlier, if you are in a dry desolate location i.e. Afghanistan or Mojave Desert where water is harder to find... MREs' make much more sense. However, by in large, most bug out locations that you plan will have lakes, streams wells or other types of water sources that you can use.

First Aid & Hygiene

This is probably the most overlooked section, if you're interested in having the ultimate bug out bag, don't neglect first aid. If you're buying a bug out bag, chances are you are getting a "chinomatic" three dollar first aid kit that amounts to nothing more than a box of band-Aids.

Seriously, as I stated earlier, even the smallest of cuts, or smallest of illnesses can be major problems in the wild.  There are far too many considerations for me to list all of the items that one could need to have in their first aid kit. This is something, like shelter, that you cannot put too much thought into.

Here are some questions to ponder: Do you take daily medication? You need to start stockpiling them now by skipping a dose every so often until you have an ample supply built up. Do you have allergies? They are only going to get worse in the woods. Is your bug out area full of snakes?

What about mosquitoes? Did you know that mosquitoes are THE deadliest animal on the planet? They have killed more humans than all of the other animals in the world ... combined. This isn't an exaggeration, look it up. Are you prone to infection? If so, you can buy fish antibiotics that are the exact same as the ones that the doctor prescribes.

We used to put these in our bug out bags, but the lawyers put a halt to that, bastards. As I mentioned earlier, dysentery has killed as many soldiers as war ... a bottle of diarrhea pills will stop you from hemorrhaging fluids and dehydration , which is what really kills you. Long story short, you cannot spend too much time planning your first aid kit.

I have never been in the field and witnessed someone pull out a first aid kit that didn't wish they had bought the better one. Hygiene is important to your health too. All of our bug out bags come with a very well stocked hygiene kit that includes: toothbrush, deodorant, comb, shampoo, razor, washcloth and many more items. 

Not only is it healthy to practice good hygiene in the woods, its also important to have the ability to make yourself look presentable should you need to resurface in town for supplies or something. Coming out of the woods looking like a woolly mammoth and smelling like Sasquatch might get you noticed. Attention is the last thing you want when bugging out.

Fire Starting and Building

Without fire you're as good as dead if you're in the woods for a prolonged amount of time. Redundancy, Redundancy, Redundancy. You need a way to build a fire under any weather condition that happens in your bug out area. Then you need a back up of that and a backup for that.

We do not put tinder in our bug out bags, but you should. Having dry tinder is a life saver when trying to start a fire., especially if you have to build a fire in a hurry. The reason we do not put it in our bob's is because there is no-way I am going to pay for something that is free in the woods ... and I wouldn't ask you to either. You need a lighter, magnesium striker, flint striker, waterproof matches and anything else that is light that can help you start a fire.

Lighting

The need to Bug Out does not only happen between 9 - 5. It happens when you least expect it. For this reason, the ultimate bug out bag needs to be prepared to bug out at night. You need a navigation light, preferably a Headlamp, a camp light, a hand crank or solar charged light that never needs batteries and candles.

The best kinds are the LED ones that just use less batteries, or the little hand-crank ones that don'€™t require batteries. If you carry small ones, you can pack 2 or 3 in the space that one big one would take up. Like the first aid kit, you will never regret buying the better flashlight, especially when it's dark.

 Shoes and Clothing

This is something that you usually need to add to your bob that is not usually included in ones that you buy.  I can't give too much advice on this subject because everyone's bug out environment is different. That being said, you should always have a set of clothes on and another set waiting. If you are in colder climates, long underwear is a must.

Hotter climates should focus on lighter colored clothes. Do not wear shorts. Never. Socks, keeping a CLEAN pair of socks, maybe two, is most advisable. The number two injury in World War I & II, right behind gun shots, were feet injuries. Your only mode of transportation in the woods are your feet, which makes them your most important asset. Change socks often, an if possible, wash the sweat and funk out of the ones you take of and let them air-dry on your pack.

If room permits, an extra set of shoes is desirable.  I break from tradition on this notion, most will tell you to have a good set of boots and that's all. In my ultimate bug out bag I have a good set of boots and a good set of extremely light, well ventilated cross country jogging shoes, often called "trainers."

These shoes are light, they dissipate sweat and are designed to be comfortable. If you have a bad blister or foot ailment arise, these shoes may just save your life. They are also great to wear around camp while you let your boots dry out overnight.

Bug Out Backpack

If you buy a cheap backpack, it will tear and it will break and it is just that simple. What good are all of Batman's toys if he lacks the ability to carry them all? The backpack is the first and foremost tool that you will use. When choosing a backpack size and weight matters. My advice to those who are bugging out, in respect to backpacks, is just the opposite of the hiker ultralight crowd, which is to go heavy.

A heavier pack usually means a thicker and more durable backpack when comparing MOLLE backpacks. The reason survivalists, and the armed forces use thick MOLLE survival packs is for their durability. If your building the ultimate bug out bag, start with a thick pack, that is double stitched, taped seams, good zippers and MOLLE webbing to hang gear from.

There are many out there, we use Condor and Eberlestock backpacks for all of our bug out bags. They are the perfect blend of quality and price. To get a good 3 day assault pack you are looking at $80 - $500 bucks. If you go cheap here, you will regret it as a backpack failure in the bush is catastrophic.

Do It Yourself Checklist

Best Damn Bug Out Bag List!

When planning your bug out bag, make a physical list of everything you think you need or could possibly need in your bug out bag. I find that having an actual printed list that I can check off is easier for me to use, however, you may prefer to use a digital version or handwritten version of a bug out bag packing list. Once your bug out bag packing list is complete, review it a few times to make sure you haven’€™t left out anything, and make notes of items you want to have more of or have left off the list.

Below are essential items and common items to have on your bug out bag list, and to pack in your bug out bag.  You will not be able to fit all of these items into one bag, you will need to pick and choose which items are best for your budget and situation. This is just a guideline, as everyone’€™s list will vary depending on their individual needs. I have included notes that were helpful to me when packing my own bug out bag.

Home-Based Bug Out Bag List

Basecamp Section
  • 3 Day Assault Pack
  •  Two Person Poly Tube Tent
  • Waterproof Bivi Bag
  • Survival Blanket
  •  Hooded Poncho
  • Pack Straps
  • Chow Utensil Kit
  • Mess Kit
  • Emergency Stove
  •  Pack Grill
  • Extra Socks
  • Gloves
  • Hand Warmers
Survival Core-Kit Items (See Examples Here)
  • MOLLE Tool Pouch
  • Mini Survival Kit
  • Bic Lighter
  • Heavy Duty Zip Ties
  • Waterproof/ Storm Matches
  • 550 Paracord
  • Army Field Manuals
  • Candles
  • G.I. Can Opener
  • Flint Fire Starter
  • Duct Tape
  • Tick & Insect Repellent
  • Mosquito Net
  • Fishing Kit
  • Sewing Kit
  • Military Style Compass
  • Sling Shot Band Kit
Rations & Water (See Examples Here)

Water is the most important thing to plan for in this section. Food on the other hand is one of the least important when bugging out from home, we can actually survive weeks without food. Besides that, when bugging out from home you can do something as simple as grabbing a bag of rice on your way out the door to sustain you for weeks.

  •  SOS Ration Bars
  • Millennium Energy Bars
  • Mountain House ProPaks
  • Homemade bags containing non-perishable items
  • MRE’s (Heavy)
  • Water Purifier Tablets
  • 2.5 Liter Hydration System
  • Straw Water Filter
  • Water sachets or pouches
  • Water filter bottle
Lights, Tools & Blades (See Examples Here)
  • Crank Flashlight that does not need batteries
  • Am/Fm Radio
  • Portable Solar Panel
  • High Lumen Flashlight
  • Headlamp w/ Extra batteries
  • Micro Multi-Tool Black
  • Entrenching Tool/ Shovel
  • Full Tang Survival Knife
  • Machete
Health, Hygiene & First Aid (See Examples Here)
  • MOLLE First Aid Kit
    • Assorted sizes of gauze pads, several of each
    • Gauze bandage
    • Surgical tape
    • Ace wrap
    • Antiseptic wipes or liquid.
    • Anti-bacterial cream
    • Alcohol pads
    • Anti-bacterial wipes
    • Waterless hand sanitizer
    • Ibuprofen
    • Acetaminophen
    • Aspirin
    • Benadryl
    • Hydrocortisone cream
    • Aloe Vera burn cream
    • Eye wash
    • Eye dropper
    • Ice pack
    • Tweezers
    • Various size needles
    • Safety pins
    • Sanitary napkins/pads
    • Scissors
    • Vinyl gloves
    • Moleskin (for blisters)
  • Hygiene Kit
    • Toothbrush
    • toothpaste
    • wet naps
    • bar of soap
    • shampoo
    • dental floss pick
    • hand and body lotion
    • deodorant gel
    • twin blade razor
    • comb
    • maxipads
    • shaving cream
    • washcloth
  • Toilet Tissue
  • NIOSH N95 Respirator Mask
  • Foot care kit
  • Potassium Iodide Tablets
  • Snake Bite Kit

 


Vehicle Bug-Out Bag List

 Your vehicle bag is an extension of your home bug out bag and should build upon what you already have. In addition to the basic supplies, here are extras that should be staple items for your car bug out bag contents list:

  • An all-in-one car emergency rescue tool that has a seat belt cutter, glass breaker tip, alarm, and flashlight.
  • The tire change kit that came with your car or one that you have purchased. Know where it is located and how to change a tire.
  • An €œauto kit€ containing car battery jumper cables, tow rope, tire puncture sealant, reflective triangle, tire pressure gauge, and oil funnel.
  • 4 Emergency road flares and lighter
  • Multi-function Swiss Army style knife tool
  • A complete medical kit that would be too big to carry in your backpack
  • Extra food and water, enough for 72 hours
  • A larger camp stove and fuel, if you’€™d like
  • An inverter with a phone charger
  • 2-way radios, enough for your entire family
  • Waterproof weather radio with extra batteries
  • Extra 5-gallon water bladder
  • 5-gallon Gas Can
  • 2 Extra tarps and rope
  • Bungee cords
  • Water filtration unit or water purifying tablets.
  • Extra sleeping bags
  • Blankets – Mylar and polar fleece ones are easy to pack.

Office Bug Out Bag

For the sake of this list, we’€™re assuming that you’€™re using your office bug out bag as a tool to get you home. An office BOB is only useful if you can easily get to it in an emergency, therefore, keep it with you and don’€™t leave it in the car. You may be trapped in your office building or unable to access your car in a disaster or crisis. In that capacity, it should include the following on your bug out bag contents list:

  • Your docs box
  • Food and water to get you home, 1-2 days’€™ worth
  • Dust mask (NIOSH approved)
  • A small first aid kid with the basics in it
  • Multi-tool knife
  • Change of clothes including shoes, socks and a jacket or coat
  • Fire kit
  • Extra medication
  • Map of the local area (Preferably with multiple routes home already marked)
  • Cash including coins

Children’€™s Bug-Out Bag

In an emergency situation, having a role and responsibility can help keep your kids from panicking. Practice emergency procedures with them regularly and let them help you pack their bug out bags so that they know what’€™s in them. Explain how to use each item in the bag and develop a plan in case you should get separated. Don’€™t just assume that everything will be OK -€“ hope for the best and prepare for the worst!

Here are a few items that will be specific to a kid’€™s bug out bag contents list:

  • Written (or drawn) map to a close designated meet-up place.
  • Document with your child’€™s personal information as well as yours
  • Change of clothes
  • 6 rations of snacks/meal bars that they can easily open
  • Water -€“ 4-6 bottles if they can carry it, and water purification tablets. For younger children, purified water pouches are lighter.
  • Medications
  • Sunscreen
  • Wind-up or shake flashlight
  • Whistle
  • Polar Blanket
  • Rain Poncho
  • Glow Sticks
  • Small first aid kit
  • 2-way radio with new batteries, set to a preset channel
  • Comfort item such as a small stuffed animal, family picture, or coloring book and crayons.

Bags for elderly relations can also be packed according to what they can carry. Don’€™t overload them, but don’€™t leave them out, either. It’€™s important in an emergency situation to be practical, but it’€™s also important to remember that morale is an integral part of survival; everybody wants to feel needed. In addition, you’€™re going to need all of the help that you can get and it would be foolish not to utilize every tool in your arsenal in order to get everybody through your ordeal safely.


Odds and Ends and Other Considerations
  • Extra Cash, Coins, Gold.
  • Important phone numbers Written Down.
  • Passport and copies of other important personal information.
  • Packet of sugar, Light and provides energy.
  • Cotton, Used to silienge clanking gear and as fire tinder.
  • Zip lock bags, Keeping stuff organized and dry is paramount
  • Sharpener, Knives and axes get dull.
  • vitamins, Prolonged bug-outs you may have days without food.
  • Extra socks, kept in ziplock bags, this can’t be stressed enough.
  • Underwear, Ditto.
  • Tea bags, Lighter and easier to prepare than coffee.
  • Map of your area, SERIOUSLY IMPORTANT.
  • Binoculars
  • Thick garbage bags, a million and one uses.
  • Collapsible cup, if not included elsewhere.
  • Magnifying glass, redundancy for fire starting.
  • Super glue, light and can extend the life of your equipment,
  • Salt & pepper, why not?
  • Bandanas, Sooo many uses, google it.
  • Personal protection, besides bug out problems, hungry things lurk in the woods.
  • GPS, make sure you have a compass as a back up and a renewable energy source.
  • Red spray paint, mark your path in unfamiliar territory.
  • Respirator or gas mask, takes a lot of room, use your best judgement.
  • Frying pan, very heavy, but extremely nice to have.
  • Gold-bond powder, for chafing and foot care.
  • Sun block, a life saver if needed.
  • Signaling mirror (great for non-zombie apocalypse)
  • Glow sticks (in case of disco)
  • Spare battery for your electronics.
  • Solar powered rechargeable batteries or plenty of extra batteries
  • Pocket Survival guide, if your’re inexperienced.
  • Edible plants guide for your area.
  • Aluminum foil, millions of uses.
  • Towel, chamois cloth.
  • Spare shoes/boots and extra laces
  • Clothes pins, Rubber bands
  • Signal flares
Should I buy or Build My Bug Out Bag?


Build or Buy a Bug Out Bag ... It's Up to You!

Why in the hell would I buy a bug out bag when I can build one? The truth is, you shouldn't if you have the time and money to do it yourself. How's that for an opening line from a website that sells bug out bags? Bug out bags are personal; you should have a hand in building your bug out bag. However, that doesn't mean you shouldn't have a starting point.

We sell the bags/packs and all of the contents for the do-it-yourself assembler of a bug out bag. We also sell pre-built bug out bags; in fact, these are our most popular items. It’s your choice which way to go. However, the fact is, we can sell complete bug out bags cheaper than you can build one, yes even at Walmart and Amazon. We buy in bulk and if you add up the price of all the items that are contained in our bags, you're saving 20-30 percent.

Buying a Bug Out Bag: Theory

Before I worked for Survivalist 101, I was in the Army. I'm not a special-ops guy or anything, in fact I was just a medic. However, being in the armed services gave me enough knowledge and confidence to build my own bug out bag.

The first thing I did is buy a good backpack. This part I got right. Then I set off around the house gathering the gear I thought I might need should I need to bug out. Why should I buy stuff when I have stuff just as good around the house, right?

Soon, I had stuff from the "junk drawer," I assume everyone has one of these, the shed, the garage, my tool box, my wife's sewing kit and a half a dozen other places around the house. For the most part, I had the beginning of a great bug out bag. Of course there were items that I needed to pick up the next time I went to Ace, Walmart, Bass Pro, CVS and the Army Navy store. But, I was well on my way to my own personal ultimate bug out bag.

As time went by, I did pick up a few extra items, but not nearly all of the items I had planned to get. Throughout the year, I realized that all of the items I had scavanged from around the house were there for a reason, because we actually used them.

So time and time again, I found myself, and my family (who never puts things back where they got them) trotting back to my bug out bag getting those items to use for day to day tasks like mowing the lawn, hanging pictures and a whole host of other odd-jobs around the house.

Soon, I really had no idea what items were still in my bob and which items never made it back into the bag. Not to mention I still had a list of items I was still meaning to buy. Then I realised, I have gone an entire year unpreppared to bug out. Had I needed to bug out in a hurry, as if there is any other way, I would not be ready, AND running around the house in a time of emergency trying to remember where everything is.

Then I thought to myself: "wouldn't it be nice to just have everything I need in one place, preplanned, brand new and ready to go?" Even if I have to duplicate items that I already have around the house, how much is that peace of mind worth? One bag that will never be robbed of tools or filled with older tools that are questionable in durability.

That's how Ultimate System Bug Out Bags were born. Since then we have endeavored to do one thing and one thing only, build the ultimate bug out bags. We are on our tenth generation ... that's ten design changes, each time tweaking the bags for greater efficiency and widening the aspect of the uses for each item is used. We have gotten a lot of things right over the years, and weeded out the mistakes.

Buying a Bug Out Bag: Technically

A bug out bag, BOB, go-bag or whatever you call it has one major purpose – contain everything you need to survive in the terrain it is designed to be used in. In other words, a bug out bag could save your life, but to do that you have to build a bug out bag with the right gear, with the right quality, in the right combination of weight and usability.

That means a good BOB is not as simple as throwing tools from the garage in an old backpack you don't use any longer. BOB's contain dozens of individual items, each one of which should serve a relevant, prioritized survival purpose. These items must be good enough to do the job under difficult and stressful conditions, and if properly planned, to be repurposed for other tasks.

We are on our 10th generation of bug out bags. We have weeded out quite a few bad products over the years, and found quite a few that over-perform their duty that cost less than other items that people usually purchase for bug out bags.

The truth is, building a kick-ass bug out bag takes time and requires some experience, and is basically an exercise in judgment. Each product really needs to be scrutinized for relevance, durability, weight-size, and usability. Which means, adapting the list of items you're working from for the most likely circumstances (such as climate and terrain) and prioritizing the contents for selection. Again, these are judgment calls, which are best when based on experience.

Buying a Bug Out Bag: Financially

On the contrary, some of our best customers are people who are confident and experienced enough to build a bug out bag as opposed to buying one. Their argument in buying a bag from us is simple: that it’s less expensive to buy our Ultimate Systems than it is to build your own bug out bag.

That's because it really is, and if you factor in your own time it's exponentially cheaper. On the other hand, if building a BOB is partly a hobby, and you don’t mind spending hours scrounging through hardware stores, shopping online, and doing a lot of research – then your own time isn’t part of the price, and you should build a bug out bag from scratch.

Just recognise, building a good bug out bag may surprise you with how much time and money it really takes, especially if you're not that familiar with the gear and its use. Like I said earlier, we sell the gear and the BOBs, so we don’t want to look like we’re stacking the deck in favor of buying pre-built bug out bags as opposed to someone who wants to build a bug out bag, but there are some very practical points in favor of that approach:

  • Buying your items one or two at a time (online) probably requires extra shipping costs.
  • As for shipping costs, running around in your own vehicle to get BOB items isn’t free.
  • Retailers of BOBs, such as Survivalist 101, buy items in volume for discounts, don’t assume their cost in a pre-built bag is way above what you’d pay yourself.
  • Items in a pre-built bag are tested, guaranteed, and ready to go.
  • Ready to go is the key phrase, a pre-built bag isn’t missing some pieces just when an emergency strikes.
  • Pre-built bug out bags may not have everything, personal taste and situations apply. You can always get specialized kits or plug ins (for example medical supplies) to compliment what’s already in the bag.

The big kicker in favor of buying a pre-built bag instead of taking the time to build a bug out bag remains in the planning by experts. If you buy from a retailer that specializes in survival gear, and more to the point, highlights that people who make the selection of what goes into a BOB are knowledgeable about the gear and actually use it; you can be reasonably sure that what you’re paying for is relevant, durable, the right weight-size combination, and usable.

Especially for your first bug out bag, it’s both practical and helpful to start with one that already has “the right stuff.” It’s a platform you can learn from and build upon. We always recommend that you field test your BOB, get to know it and the process of traveling with your life on your back.

As you gain experience, you’re in a better position to assemble some of your own gear. People who spend a lot of time hiking and camping have a saying (or something like it), “Any happy-go-lucky Joe can have great camping on sunny days. It takes a ready-for-anything Ronny to be comfortable when the weather turns bad.” Build a Bug Out Bag

This applies, in spades, to survival gear because conditions are almost inevitably going to be bad. Survival situations are inherently more serious than any recreational situation. That means bug out bags and their contents need to be seriously selected for those conditions. That’s what distinguishes buying pre-built bug out bags built by experienced people.




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